Food Fuision

Wander and Travel to……Les Papilles As They Launch a New Spring Tasting Menu

To welcome the blossoming warmth of springtime, Les Papilles, the charming French bistro on Causeway Bay’s Tang Lung Street, has rolled out a new Spring Tasting Menu ($698 per person) with traditional dishes from the south of France. Brimming with ingredients from the southern region that are rarely seen in Hong Kong and coupled with Executive Chef Jeff Chan’s knowledge of classic French cuisine, Les Papilles’ new menu brings the taste of le Midi to Hong Kong’s culinary connoisseurs.

Les Papilles’ Executive Chef, Jeff Chan, trained for a year at Jacques and Laurent Pourcelare’s two Michelin-starred Le Jardin Des Sens in Montpellier. Aside from being well versed in southern French cooking, Chef Chan also has a flair for taking the foundations of traditional recipes and adding Asian-inspired elements and innovative twists to create his own unique brand of French cuisine. Chef Chan’s creations can be as simple as the homemade Seaweed Baguette, which is served before the meal. Adapted to suit the tastes of Hong Kong diners, the recipe produces a loaf with a crisp crust and a soft, fluffy interior and is speckled with seaweed from the south of France. Smeared with butter with sea salt, this savoury baguette is a simple yet delicious opening act to the main meal.

To start, guests can enjoy an appetizer of Carabinero Carpaccio with Hummus, Crustaceans Mayonnaise, Mint Pesto and Orange Vinaigrette. Putting a unique spin on traditional hummus, Chef Chan adds French tahini and Hong Kong’s fermented bean curd to chickpeas, experimenting countless times to strike the perfect ratio so that the aromas of fermented bean curd accentuate the sweetness of the carabinero prawns. Instead of the more traditional basil, Chef Chan opts for mint in the pesto and also creates a vinaigrette with oranges to give the dish the fresh vibrancy of a spring breeze.

Another appetizer is the Scallop Nantaise with Mushroom, Babylon Shell, Mussel, Clam and Velouté Sauce. Baked with cream, egg yolks, parmesan and bread crumbs, the scallops are succulent on the inside and tantalizingly crunchy on the outside. The soul of the dish is the velouté, one of the five “mother sauces” of French cuisine. Made by simmering white fish stock with roux for 45 minutes, the sauce boasts a thick, velvety texture that pairs beautifully with seafood.

Guests can also opt for the Braised Abalone with Brown Chicken Jus and Creamy Morel Sauce (supplementary $98). With layers of South African abalone, France’s Bresse chicken and morel mushrooms served with a rich poultry jus, this dish is sure to please the most discerning diners.

For mains, guests can choose between three different options. A must-mention is the Marseille Bouillabaisse (supplementary $198). This classic fish stew started off as a dish for fisher folk and other working-class people, but as it’s grown in popularity, many of its original details have fallen through the cracks. To pay homage to the roots of this beloved dish, Chef Chan insists on flying in three types of seasonal fish from Marseille: red rascasse, conger eel and gurnard. “If you don’t use these types of fish, you can only call this a fish stew at best, not a Marseille bouillabaisse,” Chef Chan says. These three types of fish are all bony and small in size but boast a sweet flavour with no unpleasant odour. Two kilograms of fish are boiled for four hours. The meat is then added to the stew and reduced to about one litre of umami goodness. A rouille made from garlic, mayonnaise, potatoes and saffron adds even more depth to the delicious soup, which is also served with cod, sea bass, mussels, tiger prawns and other treasures from the sea.

Also worth trying is the French Aveyron Lamb Rack with Creamy Polenta, Ratatouille and Rosemary Jus. Flown in from the Aveyron region in southern France, the lamb is meatier and tenderer than its Australasian counterparts and, thanks to a mixed diet of grain and grass as well as free-range rearing, boasts a more balanced fat ratio compared to Mongolian mutton while still retaining a delicious gaminess. The lamb is at its most succulent when cooked to medium doneness, and its flavours are enhanced when eaten with creamy polenta.

Les Papilles has also imported a wide selection of French cheeses for guests to savour, including the semi-soft morbier and mothais goat’s cheese. And because the south of France is well known for its sheep breeding, the Les Papilles Cheese Platter (supplementary $148) also includes perail, a soft ewe’s milk cheese that boasts a delectable sweetness and nutty aroma. Guests with a sweet tooth can also tuck into the Mille Feuille Ruby Chocolate. With its distinct pink hue and berry-like flavour, ruby chocolate – known as the “fourth type of chocolate” – brings a refreshing sweet and sour twist to the classic French pastry and ends the meal on a wonderful sugar high.

All prices are subject to 10% service charge.

Les Papilles

Address:

G/F, 44 Tang Lung Street, Causeway Bay

Telephone:

3114 2389

Operating hours:

Monday-Saturday, 12pm-11:30pm

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/lespapilleshk

Instagram:

https://www.instagram.com/lespapilleshk/?hl=zh-hk

To welcome the blossoming warmth of springtime, Les Papilles, the charming French bistro on Causeway Bay’s Tang Lung Street, has rolled out a new Spring Tasting Menu ($698 per person) with traditional dishes from the south of France. Brimming with ingredients from the southern region that are rarely seen in Hong Kong and coupled with Executive Chef Jeff Chan’s knowledge of classic French cuisine, Les Papilles’ new menu brings the taste of le Midi to Hong Kong’s culinary connoisseurs.

Les Papilles’ Executive Chef, Jeff Chan, trained for a year at Jacques and Laurent Pourcelare’s two Michelin-starred Le Jardin Des Sens in Montpellier. Aside from being well versed in southern French cooking, Chef Chan also has a flair for taking the foundations of traditional recipes and adding Asian-inspired elements and innovative twists to create his own unique brand of French cuisine. Chef Chan’s creations can be as simple as the homemade Seaweed Baguette, which is served before the meal. Adapted to suit the tastes of Hong Kong diners, the recipe produces a loaf with a crisp crust and a soft, fluffy interior and is speckled with seaweed from the south of France. Smeared with butter with sea salt, this savoury baguette is a simple yet delicious opening act to the main meal.

To start, guests can enjoy an appetizer of Carabinero Carpaccio with Hummus, Crustaceans Mayonnaise, Mint Pesto and Orange Vinaigrette. Putting a unique spin on traditional hummus, Chef Chan adds French tahini and Hong Kong’s fermented bean curd to chickpeas, experimenting countless times to strike the perfect ratio so that the aromas of fermented bean curd accentuate the sweetness of the carabinero prawns. Instead of the more traditional basil, Chef Chan opts for mint in the pesto and also creates a vinaigrette with oranges to give the dish the fresh vibrancy of a spring breeze.

Another appetizer is the Scallop Nantaise with Mushroom, Babylon Shell, Mussel, Clam and Velouté Sauce. Baked with cream, egg yolks, parmesan and bread crumbs, the scallops are succulent on the inside and tantalizingly crunchy on the outside.  The soul of the dish is the velouté, one of the five “mother sauces” of French cuisine. Made by simmering white fish stock with roux for 45 minutes, the sauce boasts a thick, velvety texture that pairs beautifully with seafood.

Guests can also opt for the Braised Abalone with Brown Chicken Jus and Creamy Morel Sauce (supplementary $98). With layers of South African abalone, France’s Bresse chicken and morel mushrooms served with a rich poultry jus, this dish is sure to please the most discerning diners.

For mains, guests can choose between three different options. A must-mention is the Marseille Bouillabaisse (supplementary $198). This classic fish stew started off as a dish for fisher folk and other working-class people, but as it’s grown in popularity, many of its original details have fallen through the cracks. To pay homage to the roots of this beloved dish, Chef Chan insists on flying in three types of seasonal fish from Marseille: red rascasse, conger eel and gurnard. “If you don’t use these types of fish, you can only call this a fish stew at best, not a Marseille bouillabaisse,” Chef Chan says. These three types of fish are all bony and small in size but boast a sweet flavour with no unpleasant odour. Two kilograms of fish are boiled for four hours. The meat is then added to the stew and reduced to about one litre of umami goodness. A rouille made from garlic, mayonnaise, potatoes and saffron adds even more depth to the delicious soup, which is also served with cod, sea bass, mussels, tiger prawns and other treasures from the sea.

Also worth trying is the French Aveyron Lamb Rack with Creamy Polenta, Ratatouille and Rosemary Jus. Flown in from the Aveyron region in southern France, the lamb is meatier and tenderer than its Australasian counterparts and, thanks to a mixed diet of grain and grass as well as free-range rearing, boasts a more balanced fat ratio compared to Mongolian mutton while still retaining a delicious gaminess. The lamb is at its most succulent when cooked to medium doneness, and its flavours are enhanced when eaten with creamy polenta.

Les Papilles has also imported a wide selection of French cheeses for guests to savour, including the semi-soft morbier and mothais goat’s cheese. And because the south of France is well known for its sheep breeding, the Les Papilles Cheese Platter (supplementary $148) also includes perail, a soft ewe’s milk cheese that boasts a delectable sweetness and nutty aroma. Guests with a sweet tooth can also tuck into the Mille Feuille Ruby Chocolate. With its distinct pink hue and berry-like flavour, ruby chocolate – known as the “fourth type of chocolate” – brings a refreshing sweet and sour twist to the classic French pastry and ends the meal on a wonderful sugar high.

All prices are subject to 10% service charge.

Les Papilles
Address:G/F, 44 Tang Lung Street, Causeway Bay
Telephone:3114 2389
Operating hours:Monday-Saturday, 12pm-11:30pm
Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/lespapilleshk
Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/lespapilleshk/?hl=zh-hk

To welcome the blossoming warmth of springtime, Les Papilles, the charming French bistro on Causeway Bay’s Tang Lung Street, has rolled out a new Spring Tasting Menu ($698 per person) with traditional dishes from the south of France. Brimming with ingredients from the southern region that are rarely seen in Hong Kong and coupled with Executive Chef Jeff Chan’s knowledge of classic French cuisine, Les Papilles’ new menu brings the taste of le Midi to Hong Kong’s culinary connoisseurs.

Les Papilles’ Executive Chef, Jeff Chan, trained for a year at Jacques and Laurent Pourcelare’s two Michelin-starred Le Jardin Des Sens in Montpellier. Aside from being well versed in southern French cooking, Chef Chan also has a flair for taking the foundations of traditional recipes and adding Asian-inspired elements and innovative twists to create his own unique brand of French cuisine. Chef Chan’s creations can be as simple as the homemade Seaweed Baguette, which is served before the meal. Adapted to suit the tastes of Hong Kong diners, the recipe produces a loaf with a crisp crust and a soft, fluffy interior and is speckled with seaweed from the south of France. Smeared with butter with sea salt, this savoury baguette is a simple yet delicious opening act to the main meal.

To start, guests can enjoy an appetizer of Carabinero Carpaccio with Hummus, Crustaceans Mayonnaise, Mint Pesto and Orange Vinaigrette. Putting a unique spin on traditional hummus, Chef Chan adds French tahini and Hong Kong’s fermented bean curd to chickpeas, experimenting countless times to strike the perfect ratio so that the aromas of fermented bean curd accentuate the sweetness of the carabinero prawns. Instead of the more traditional basil, Chef Chan opts for mint in the pesto and also creates a vinaigrette with oranges to give the dish the fresh vibrancy of a spring breeze.

Another appetizer is the Scallop Nantaise with Mushroom, Babylon Shell, Mussel, Clam and Velouté Sauce. Baked with cream, egg yolks, parmesan and bread crumbs, the scallops are succulent on the inside and tantalizingly crunchy on the outside.  The soul of the dish is the velouté, one of the five “mother sauces” of French cuisine. Made by simmering white fish stock with roux for 45 minutes, the sauce boasts a thick, velvety texture that pairs beautifully with seafood.

Guests can also opt for the Braised Abalone with Brown Chicken Jus and Creamy Morel Sauce (supplementary $98). With layers of South African abalone, France’s Bresse chicken and morel mushrooms served with a rich poultry jus, this dish is sure to please the most discerning diners.

For mains, guests can choose between three different options. A must-mention is the Marseille Bouillabaisse (supplementary $198). This classic fish stew started off as a dish for fisher folk and other working-class people, but as it’s grown in popularity, many of its original details have fallen through the cracks. To pay homage to the roots of this beloved dish, Chef Chan insists on flying in three types of seasonal fish from Marseille: red rascasse, conger eel and gurnard. “If you don’t use these types of fish, you can only call this a fish stew at best, not a Marseille bouillabaisse,” Chef Chan says. These three types of fish are all bony and small in size but boast a sweet flavour with no unpleasant odour. Two kilograms of fish are boiled for four hours. The meat is then added to the stew and reduced to about one litre of umami goodness. A rouille made from garlic, mayonnaise, potatoes and saffron adds even more depth to the delicious soup, which is also served with cod, sea bass, mussels, tiger prawns and other treasures from the sea.

Also worth trying is the French Aveyron Lamb Rack with Creamy Polenta, Ratatouille and Rosemary Jus. Flown in from the Aveyron region in southern France, the lamb is meatier and tenderer than its Australasian counterparts and, thanks to a mixed diet of grain and grass as well as free-range rearing, boasts a more balanced fat ratio compared to Mongolian mutton while still retaining a delicious gaminess. The lamb is at its most succulent when cooked to medium doneness, and its flavours are enhanced when eaten with creamy polenta.

Les Papilles has also imported a wide selection of French cheeses for guests to savour, including the semi-soft morbier and mothais goat’s cheese. And because the south of France is well known for its sheep breeding, the Les Papilles Cheese Platter (supplementary $148) also includes perail, a soft ewe’s milk cheese that boasts a delectable sweetness and nutty aroma. Guests with a sweet tooth can also tuck into the Mille Feuille Ruby Chocolate. With its distinct pink hue and berry-like flavour, ruby chocolate – known as the “fourth type of chocolate” – brings a refreshing sweet and sour twist to the classic French pastry and ends the meal on a wonderful sugar high.

All prices are subject to 10% service charge.

Les Papilles
Address:G/F, 44 Tang Lung Street, Causeway Bay
Telephone:3114 2389
Operating hours:Monday-Saturday, 12pm-11:30pm
Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/lespapilleshk
Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/lespapilleshk/?hl=zh-hk

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